About your Search

20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
cain in ohio, and came within two points. the technology included the so-called system, which was the republican get out the vote technology to ensure we targeted people to get to the polls. that imploded. i'm told on election day, actually, so many hits from around the country as it should have saying, gee, this person voted, this person didn't, target calls, thought it was under attack, and closed down. for those of you here from, again, the technology field with the politics, we, republicans, want to talk to you. [laughter] we need help. the democrat system is calledded gordon, it was effective at microtargetting, and i heard a lot of antedotes, and you'll love somebody gets a call who is a democrat in law school, and it was gee, you know, we see that you have voted, this information is public available. we see you voted at two o'clock on election day, but your sister, at two lane, has not voted, could you call her? that's the level at which they were dealing, whereas, you know, we were flying blind at that point. part of it is technology, and part of a turnout that was imp
. trying to use new, smart technology, that kind of stuff, pretending to get solutions and at the same time, let's say the political diplomatic approach doesn't provide solution in the end. so, isn't it a signal that we are shifting from her politics and diplomacy and rely on tools of solutions. >> is the war on terror divided into a problem rather than addressing the more fundamental issues that might have led to the spread in popularity of chiapas in the first place? >> i certainly think the footprint strategy is intended to do exactly what the questioner is suggesting here, which is simply one of containment, but to do without sending in 100,000 troops and accepting a chilling doublers along the way. but you think about the american reaction to 9/11, 9/11 cost the attackers may be have been dollars of "the new york times" went about trying to do an assessment at the 10 year anniversary of what we spend in total in reaction to 9/11. everything from rebuilding the buildings to the wars in afghanistan and iraq to homeland security and so forth. the number we came up with was $3.3 trillion i
is julian sanchez, a senior research fellow covering technology, privacy, and civil liberties. jeremy, once again, a reminder that even though you hit the delete button, it doesn't disappear completely, does it? >> everything can be tracked, traced, monitored and recovered. if you have something really important or private, either say it in person, put it on a piece of paper, burn the piece of paper, nothing is private anymore. >> even a draft? you didn't even send the draft. >> there are two kind of people that use this technique. it's teenagers and people who read "the girl with the dragon tattoo." this is a pretty well-known technique. it isn't super secret. it's more than what you'd expect from the average person to do, but if somebody wants it get into a g-mail account, the most e-mailed article last week in "the new york times" was how to protect your password. people are just getting a feel for out insecure their online e-mail accounts are, but they're very vulnerable. >> so they're figuring out your password. >> julian, you're troubled this investigation began to begin with. it did
has fallen off the table. we have the technology now to make this information available almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic line. good morning, lynette. caller: i have not been watching
, driverless cars may be the thing of the future, but one car apparently could not wait for the new technology to evolve. >> take a look at this bizarre scene in wildwood, new jersey. the car keeps going in circles. backward with no one at all behind the wheel. after standing by helplessly, a hero emerges believed to be the fire chief jumping in from the passenger's side window. >> looks like the "dukes of hazard" car. little bit. lots of cheers from the crowd. it all started when drivers and passengers decided to switch side. as both men got out, the car slipped into reverse. >> well done. coming up next, the champagne blues. >> france's bubbly is going flat. we're going to tell you why and what it means for your new year's toast right after this. it's all coming up on "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" weather, brought to you by lifestyle lift. hd3 >>> well, the new halo 4 game is proving to be an angel for microsoft. the sci-fi shoot-'em-up action game raked in $220 million sales globally last tuesday, the first day of sale. >> that beats the record set by previous installment
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5